Posts with the label music
Showing posts with label music. Show all posts
Showing posts with label music. Show all posts

Tuesday, 7 June 2022

Sam Ryder and Nathan Dawe join the star-studded line-up for Capital’s Summertime Ball with Barclaycard!


The UK’s biggest summer party just got even bigger! Capital Breakfast’s Roman Kemp, Sian Welby and Sonny Jay have confirmed on air this morning (Tuesday 7th June) that Sam Ryder and Nathan Dawe have joined the star-studded line-up for Capital’s Summertime Ball with Barclaycard, which takes place this Sunday 12th June at Wembley Stadium. 

 

The stratospheric rise of the UK’s Eurovision hero Sam Ryder continues, as he gets ready to take to the world-famous Wembley Stadium stage at Capital’s Summertime Ball with Barclaycard. Sam – who topped The Official Big Top 40 chart last month with ‘SPACE MAN’ - is one of the hottest acts in the country right now following his phenomenal success flying the flag for the UK at Eurovision 2022.

 

Nathan Dawe is also confirmed to play the Ball, where he’s guaranteed to bring major summer party vibes to 80,000 Capital listeners. The multi-platinum-selling DJ and producer is responsible for huge hits including ‘Lighter’ featuring KSI, ‘Flowers’ feat. Jaykae and MALIKA, and his most recent release, ‘21 Reasons’ with Ella Henderson.

 

Sam Ryder and Nathan Dawe join the bill after Capital Breakfast’s Roman Kemp, Sian Welby and Sonny Jay revealed on air yesterday that Maisie Peters, who is currently supporting Ed Sheeran on his ‘+ – = ÷ x Tour’, will play Capital’s Summertime Ball with Barclaycard. The singer-songwriter is one of this year’s most hotly tipped rising stars and her set is not to be missed.

 

The countdown to Capital’s Summertime Ball with Barclaycard is officially on, and the only way in is to win – listen to Capital for the chance to join the sold-out crowd of 80,000 Capital listeners at the UK’s biggest summer party this Sunday.

 

Yesterday Capital revealed four-time GRAMMY Award-winning and seven-time BRIT Award-winning superstar Ed Sheeran will open the show on Sunday. Live DJ sets from Capital’s Marvin Humes and MistaJam will get the crowd in party mode from midday onwards when the doors open, before Ed Sheeran takes to the world-famous Summertime Ball stage at 2pm for a very special set. For those watching at home the Global Player live stream starts from 2pm. 

 

Listen to Capital across the UK on FM, DAB digital radio, on Global Player on your smart speaker (“play Capital”), iOS or Android device and at capitalfm.com.


Watch Capital’s Summertime Ball with Barclaycard live on Global Player, this Sunday 12th June from 2pm.

 

Follow @CapitalOfficial and #CapitalSTB on TikTok, Instagram, Twitter and Facebook and keep it Capital for all the behind the scenes action and backstage gossip live from Wembley Stadium.


Sam Ryder and Nathan Dawe join the star-studded line-up for Capital’s Summertime Ball with Barclaycard!

Tuesday, 7 June 2022

Friday, 25 March 2022

Lois Morgan Gay Releases Debut Single 'Don't Be That Guy'


Listen to the single ‘Don’t Be That Guy’ here

Lois Morgan Gay is so excited to release her debut single ‘Don’t Be That Guy' which will be available on all music streaming platforms from March 25th 2022. The track is influenced by a mix of performers including Lianne La Havas, Amy Winehouse and Aretha Franklin. 'Don’t Be That Guy' explores the inner monologue of yearning more from someone rather than just being friends.

"Have you ever gotten to that point in a relationship where it is going really well and you are hopeful that it's going to work then…BANG! They are not ready for anything “serious” and then end up being just another failed relationship? That's what this song is about haha” Lois says.

Lois crafted the single with musician/guitarist Jack Louis Rennie who helped with music arrangement and also plays guitar on the track alongside Meelie Traill on bass, and Max Blunos on drums. The track is produced by Ben Robbins.

The London based singer/songwriter was born and raised in Bristol, she delivers smooth R&B with a soulful feel to her voice, writing about heartbreak, relationships, and yearning. Her music is vocally led, having been heavily inspired by the likes of Adele, Aretha Franklin and YEBBA. Music has always been a huge part of Lois' life, there was always music playing in the house growing up. Lois began her performing career in theatre and then discovered her love for singing and writing at the age of 14. She states "Telling a story and expressing my feelings and inner thoughts through my music enables me to connect with the audience and that is the best feeling in the world”.

Lois is currently in the line-up of the final to win a £100,000 record deal with Alpha records, she will perform at the Indigo at the O2 Arena on March 30th where she will debut this song live for the very first time.

Lois Morgan Gay Releases Debut Single 'Don't Be That Guy'

Friday, 25 March 2022

Monday, 22 October 2018

In The Studio with Sharon Sexton and Rob Fowler | Vision of You


Stars of Bat Out of Hell the musical Rob Fowler and Sharon Sexton are currently in the process of recording their debut duets album, Vision of You. The album is not only a celebration and showcase of their glorious vocals, but tells the back story of Sloane and Falco, the characters they play in the show.

I went along to the recording studio for a sneak peek at the process and to chat to the pair about the album and how the journey has been so far:


Alongside Sharon and Rob is pianist extraordinaire, Steve Corley who provides the beautiful accompaniments for the pieces and brings a warmth and real feel to the music. Sharon describes the album as "a box of chocolates" which has something for everyone and the pair hope it will be a treat for both fans and non-fans of Bat Out of Hell.

Vision of You features music from a number of artists, including The Civil Wars, Lady Gaga, Jim Steinman and Glenn Hansard, all artists whom Sharon and Rob have been inspired by.



From what I've seen so far of Vision of You, I know that it's going to be an incredibly raw, heartfelt and moving piece of work. For updates on the album keep an eye on Rob and Sharon's social media accounts and be sure to pick up your copy, either digitally or at the Dominion Theatre when it's released!

Full video interview and sneak peek at Poison and Wine is available here

In The Studio with Sharon Sexton and Rob Fowler | Vision of You

Monday, 22 October 2018

Wednesday, 18 April 2018

The Rat Pack- Live From Las Vegas (UK Tour), New Victoria Theatre | Review


The Rat Pack- Live From Las Vegas (UK Tour)
New Victoria Theatre 
Reviewed on Tuesday 17th April 2018 by Valerie Field
★★★★

The Rat Pack Live opens with Garrett Phillips who plays Sinatra introducing himself and the show and trying to get the audience participation go. Unfortunately this didn't quite work out as the theatre was very under-booked. 

Once this initial opening was over and the show got going everyone enjoyed his performance. He has a great voice and even the look of Frank Sinatra. In fact if you closed your eyes it could have been him. Philips really knows how to channel the musical master.

Nigel Casey also has a good voice but unfortunately doesn't come across as relaxed and cool as his character Dean Martin. There was a change of actor at the last minute for Sammy Davis Jr. He was played by last night by Darren Charles who I must say was a very good entertainer but didn't quite come across as his character.


Part way through the show we are introduced to the Burelli Sisters played by Laura Darton, Amelia Adams-Pearce and Joanna Walters. This brings glamour and a bit of pizzazz to the show as their performances are very, very good. 

The late appearance of Nicola Emmanuel as Ella Fitzgerald really lifts the show as she is fantastic- it's a shame she is not utilised more in the show.

The orchestra are great and all the music and songs are brilliantly and energetically performed. Unfortunately for the cast the theatre was fairly empty but the audience who were there were very appreciative and gave them a standing ovation after the rousing rendition of  My Way.

Anyone who is Sinatra fan will enjoy the show. The music is nostalgic, well performed and provides fantastic entertainment. The Rat Pack- Live From Las Vegas is well worth a visit and I had a very enjoyable evening.

The Rat Pack- Live at Las Vegas runs at the New Victoria Theatre until 21st April before continuing it's tour.

The Rat Pack- Live From Las Vegas (UK Tour), New Victoria Theatre | Review

Wednesday, 18 April 2018

Friday, 8 December 2017

Sinners Club, Soho Theatre | Review


Sinners Club
Soho Theatre
Reviewed on Thursday 7th December 2017 by Shaun Dicks 
★★★★

The Soho Theatre invites you to the Sinners Club. We find ourselves in the Upstairs space of this buzzing theatre in the heart of London’s West End. As we walk in we are welcomed by a room set in the round, decorated as an old school recording studio; many an old-fashioned rug, musical instruments and microphones, soundproofing on the wall as well as a few photographs. Scattered around the studio space are members of the band playing light Jazz music to set the mood. 

The concept of the album is simple, its based on the story of the last woman to be hanged in the UK. The original songs written and performed by Lucy Rivers and the band The Bad Mothers- tailored around the story of Ruth Ellis- are an eclectic mix of genres that seem to pulsate through Rivers as they affect her own character narrative as well as the albums. As Rivers enters to start the show, she is this fierce woman in black, taking control of the room. Rivers throughout the show is energetic and intriguing as she goes through the narrative of the concept album. 

However, one of her flaws was her reliance on the audience and audience interaction. The reliance on an audience is a double-edged sword dependant on the audience itself, it can be a struggle for an audience to lose inhibitions and join in. Rivers needs to pick her moments and judge the moments when she does or doesn’t interact. Another thing that needs altering within the show is the amount of dead air in-between songs. As a performer myself I appreciate the device of silence but when its long periods, it becomes a period of time for the audience to wander. 


Despite these flaws of the show, the music really made it- in a world of music made by computers in the mainstream and the jazz hands of the West End - this was a refreshing use of alternative types of music. The whole band was slick, and looked like they were having fun throughout the show. Rivers’ voice soared throughout, despite her over use of falsetto. What truly impressed this writer though was the musicianship packed within the show. The sheer volume of different instruments used was brilliant and to a very high quality. I personally appreciate musicians and musicianship, having worked with a few myself, so to have a live band and for it perform so well, it really brought a smile to my face. 

If you’re looking for something a little different, take up your invitation for the Sinners Club, because despite its flaws, there are many a good aspect of this show to enjoy. This show is the palate cleanser that the West End is craving. Try something different and enjoy a night of music that you will not forget in a hurry.

Sinners Club runs at the Soho Theatre until December 30th

photo credit: Kieran Cudlip

Sinners Club, Soho Theatre | Review

Friday, 8 December 2017

Monday, 4 December 2017

Marisha Wallace: Soul Holiday, Charing Cross Theatre | Review


Marisha Wallace: Soul Holiday (Concert) 
Charing Cross Theatre 
Reviewed on Sunday 3rd December 2017 by Olivia Mitchell 
★★★★★

There's no denying that Marisha Wallace is a powerhouse; in the short time she's been in London she's really made herself a feature of the West End and a must see star. Continuing her conquest of the West End theatre scene, Marisha recently released a Christmas album, Soul Holiday, full of festive treats to get us all in the Christmas spirit and yesterday performed these musical gems for us at the Charing Cross Theatre.

The concert included her jazzy Christmas re-imaginations, gospel songs and some musical theatre classics as well as her hilarious/motivational/all round brilliant interludes between songs. Her warm personality, outstanding vocals and ability to work a crowd had the audience in the palm of her hand within a matter of moments.

Personal highlights included 'O Come All Ye Faithful', the brilliantly upbeat 'Joyful, Joyful', and her heartfelt performance of 'I'll Be Home For Christmas' which she explained was particularly meaningful as she's been away from her family and friends for so long. 'He Chose Me' was vocally faultless and especially moving. Her stunning rendition of 'I'm Here' from The Colour Purple (she played Celie in the production at Cadogan Hall) was incredible and a testament to her vocal and acting skills.

Two fantastic guests joined the festive bliss with Tyrone Huntley showing off his smooth, glorious voice in 'Last Christmas' and 'What's Going On' and Rachel Tucker in the Christmas favourite, 'Winter Wonderland' and the hilarious, belt-tastic 'Take Me or Leave Me' from Rent. Both were great, their friendship with Marisha really shone through and contributed to the warm and cosy, festive feeling.

Marisha spoke candidly about a number of topics including her grandmother who inspired her to continue singing, food (a festive staple) and Jesus. Whilst she spoke a lot about her religion, it was not in a forceful way and she explained that "it doesn't matter who or what you believe in, just believe in you and that you can do anything". It was refreshing to hear such honesty and motivation.

Whilst the 5pm audience were not the most enthusiastic, everyone still seemed to enjoy the concert as they basked in the glory of Marisha's voice and talent.  The intimate setting with the four fantastic band members, three backup singers, two gorgeous gowns and one Marisha was all there needed to be to create an evening of festive magic. 

Marisha is charmismatic, charming, vocally outstanding and just a born performer. I have no doubt that Marisha's career will keep going up and up as she reaches wider audiences and shows people what a first-rate performer she is and I can't wait to see what's to come. To feel the festive vibes, be sure to grab your copy of Soul Holiday and get along to see Marisha whenever you can! 

Marisha Wallace: Soul Holiday, Charing Cross Theatre | Review

Monday, 4 December 2017

Monday, 6 November 2017

Opera: Passion, Power and Politics, Victoria and Albert Museum | Review


Opera: Passion, Power and Politics (Exhibition)
Victoria and Albert Museum
Reviewed on Sunday 5th November 2017 by Olivia Mitchell 
★★★★★

Opera: Passion, Power and Politics is a vast and exhilarating exhibition which explores the complex and beautiful history of opera as well as its power to affect us all. In collaboration with the Royal Opera House, the exhibition examines seven operas both in the context of the composer's lives and the cities and countries they were originally performed in (the only exception is the 1861 Paris production of Wagner's Tannhäuser.) The final room takes us into  the modern day with a selection of operas premiered in the last seventy or so years. 

The exhibition is extravagant and immersive; visitors are supplied with headsets which play pieces to accompany the route which evoke both intellectual and visceral feelings. Whilst I thoroughly enjoyed the entire exhibition and the accompanying music, I find it somewhat odd that the actual musical element is made optional, although there are so many factors which go into making an opera great, the music is certainly the most crucial. 


Wandering around the exhibition space it's amazing to see how opera changed so much whilst keeping its original roots. The displays become more and more lavish, with stunning costumes and other objects becoming grander as we get further in. The political climate and opera have always been thoroughly linked and it is particularly striking to see the sudden return to minimalism during the Soviet Modernism movement when Shostakovich's Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk was suppressed in 1936 and to be taken literally to the battlefield when the music is replaced with the sound of distant gunfire as we move to study Verdi's Nabucco.

This is overall a remarkable exhibition, which like the Opera itself, really needs to be seen and heard to truly be appreciated. The amount of information displayed is overwhelming but exciting throughout and both Opera lovers and Opera newbies are sure to learn something interesting. Visually experiencing the humanity and social relevance of the seven pieces is moving and compelling and I highly recommend you go and experience it yourself.

Opera: Passion, Power and Politics is on display at the Victoria and Albert museum until February 25th 2018.

Opera: Passion, Power and Politics, Victoria and Albert Museum | Review

Monday, 6 November 2017

Thursday, 19 October 2017

War Horse (UK Tour), Bristol Hippodrome | Review


War Horse (UK Tour)
Bristol Hippodrome
Reviewed on Wednesday 18th September 2017 by Isobelle Desbrow

On the 10th anniversary since their first show, I was lucky enough to go and watch War Horse. The play is emotion filled and the stunning story telling through the music and ensemble work make the show a must see.

The first act tells the story of Albert training his horse, Joey who we see grow from a foal, to a riding horse, to a farm horse and finally to a war horse. Joey is controlled by 3 puppeteers: the head, heart and hind. This allows the puppet to mimic and move as if it were a real horse, something that is not easy by any means. Bob Fox’s spectacular folk voice helps tell the story through music,adding the perfect amount music to accompany the drama onstage. The cast are amazing as they all play multiple characters but if I hadn’t have looked throughly at the program I would never had known, as each character on stage had a different accent and characteristics. This show truly highlights the amazing work that can be produced by an ensemble cast. 



Thomas Dennis as Albert brought the perfect mix of innocence and will to fight for what he believes in: saving and bringing Joey home from the war. His portrayal of Albert was emotional and moving he deserves credit for his acting talents. 

At the end of the first act we see the beginning of the war and Albert going off to find Joey. These scenes were powerful, compelling, honest and emotional, showing the audience another aspect of World War 1, which I had never seen before.

Something that I haven’t mentioned yet but is off massive importance for the story telling aspect of War Horse is the large projection on to a cloud above the stage; throughout the story, drawings and animations are shown. This adds another dimension to the story, and without spoiling the show for those who haven’t seen it without these images the story wouldn’t be as complete.




Act 2 is spectacularly beautiful and sad. We are shown both the loss on the home front and the front line. However instead of just being shown the fighting aspects we are also shown how the Germans used the horses to move machinery around and pull carts, we follow Albert and Topthorn on their journey through France and whether or not they get the happy ending they deserve. We also see the cruel side when the horses go lame they are no longer required, something that although normal is still shocking to see.

“The puppets in the show are only wood, however it is our imaginations that make them real.” This is how the play was described by Tom Morris at the end of yesterday’s special 10th anniversary show, and I believe this is the perfect way of describing the complexity and beauty of War Horse.

I don’t want to give too much more away but if you have the opportunity, go and watch War Horse- it is not to be missed. 

War Horse (UK Tour), Bristol Hippodrome | Review

Thursday, 19 October 2017

Thursday, 28 September 2017

Jane Eyre, National Theatre | Review


Jane Eyre
Lyttleton Theatre, National Theatre
Reviewed on Wednesday 27th September 2017 by Olivia Mitchell 

The National Theatre are outstanding at championing new, innovative work and thinking outside the box to bring audiences spectacular shows, something which they have once again succeeded at with this Sally Cookson's production of Jane Eyre. In Bristol, the tale was split into two parts but artistic director Rufus Norris has wisely squeezed the action into one performance.

I'm sure I'm not alone in having gruelling flashbacks to A-level English literature when I hear Brontë's novel mentioned, and what's lovely about this adaptation, thanks to the minimal sets, is that it allows the audience to create the world of Jane Eyre with their imagination as they would do when reading the book. The set is extremely modernistic in it's simplistic design with no grand structures to show the various momentous locations in Jane's life but instead using wooden platforms, metal structures and ladders as a framework for the action. The use of lighting is particularly impressive with white cloth backdrop that surrounds the stage being changed to different colours to show the various moods. The shocking red room is especially effective.

What struck me about this production is not only how modern it is in terms of aesthetics but how contemporary the character of Jane herself is. She's feisty with strong morals and a real feminist side. Although having seen her as ahead of her time when I read the novel, I'd never realised how truly relatable she is until watching this production. Her quest for freedom whilst not compromising her passions is joyous to watch.

The strong use of physical theatre added an intensity to the piece, as well as flow, especially in the running transitions during Jane's travels. The varying motion from smooth lyrical to frenzied, perfectly mirrored the changes in Jane's physical and metal health throughout. Another particularly interesting aspect was members of the ensemble speaking Jane's thought's aloud. This was humourous at times but also a very clever way of developing the character more without her having to tell the audience anything directly.

The trio of onstage musicians added a whole other layer with a number of musical styles accompanying crucial moments and transitions. Melanie Marshall was absolutely fantastic both physically and vocally; singing atmospheric pieces to fit with other characters or her own, Bertha. Her voice is strong and angelic whilst having a menacing and painful side. Her rendition of Crazy was notably unexpected but brilliant and perfectly woven into the story.

As Jane, Nadia Clifford exceptionally plays the fiery 10 year old girl who transitions into a headstrong but more rational woman. Clifford perfectly shows Jane's unyielding side but also her pain and love for Rochester. Tim Delap is suitably brooding as Rochester but adds a depth and awkwardness which makes him charming and attractive.

The entire ensemble are faultless but I must give a special mention firstly, to Paul Mundell who is hilarious as Pilot, adding some welcome humour. And secondly to Hannah Bristow who perfectly and distinctly plays Adele, Helen, Grace Poole and others.

This is a somewhat lengthy (3 hours and 15 minutes) play, but a striking production of a classic. The start is slightly slow but as we get into the action the momentum speeds up and we really get to see is the power of one of the first literary modern women.

Jane Eyre, National Theatre | Review

Thursday, 28 September 2017